Batteries are devices that store chemical energy to convert into electrical energy. Batteries allow electronic devices to be portable and not depend on being plugged into an electrical outlet. Here are some of the many items that use batteries to operate. 

Mobile Phones

People depend highly on the battery power of mobile smartphones to carry them around wherever they need to go. The capacity and durability of the battery are two of the most important things to consider when shopping for a new smartphone. As phones get older, the batteries Winter Garden FL in the device begin to wear out more quickly. Having a phone that runs out of battery quickly or that is slow to charge is one of the main reasons people buy a new mobile phone. 

Clocks

A battery likely powers the trusty alarm clock that wakes you up in the morning. Some bedrooms, particularly those in older homes, do not have a large number of electrical outlets to plug devices into. Having an alarm clock that is battery powered frees an outlet for a device that cannot run on battery, such as a lamp or television. Wall clocks also often run on batteries to prevent needing to have an unsightly cord running down the wall from the clock into an outlet. 

Robot Vacuums

Robot vacuums are relatively new devices that automatically clean the floors of a house without needing to have a person involved. This means that they cannot be powered by a cord and plug like a traditional vacuum, which a person needs to unplug and plug back in each time they go clean another room. Having a reliable battery in your robot vacuum ensures that the device does not stop working halfway through its job. 

These are three of the many portable, electronic items you can thank batteries for.

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